Comic Review: La Matadragones

La Matadragones by Jaime Hernández

La Matadragones
by Jaime HernándezF. Isabel Campoy (contributor)
4 out of 5 stars

Este cómic cuenta tres historias tradicionales de Latinoamerica sobre varitas mágicas, dragones, tontas amas de casa, y terceros hijos perezosos.

Me encanta la estructura tradicional de los cuentos de hadas y los giros imaginativos que toman las historias. Cada historia tiene elementos emocionantes y cierta repetición al igual que las historias tradicionales. Y, por supuesto, hay una lección moral al final. Las historias mantuvieron mi atención y aprecié los personajes interesantes que encajan en los roles de los viejos cuentos de hadas.

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Graphic Novel Review: Wildflowers

Wildflowers by Liniers

Wildflowers
by Liniers (Author, Illustrator)
5 out of 5 stars

Three little girls are stranded on a desert island. They explore the jungle and discover magical animals and wildflowers that can talk. It even appears to snow in this strange jungle. The girls explore the wildness all around them and the wildness within themselves as well. The only thing that can kill the magic is reality.

I actually started crying after reading this book, because it was just that beautiful and sweet! The girls are so imaginative and charming! I love the sisterly camaraderie between them, and the way the older sister takes care of the younger ones.

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Graphic Novel Review: The Sprite and the Gardener

The Sprite and the Gardener by Joe Whitt

The Sprite and the Gardener
by Joe WhittRii Abrego (Illustrations)
5 out of 5 stars

Wisteria is a little sprite who is new to the area. The sprites live in a neighborhood where the humans do all the gardening, so the ancient art of using magic to help the plants grow has been completely lost. Wisteria begins to experiment with a budding power, and finds that she can make a difference in one small garden.

This graphic novel is so adorable! All the little sprites are so beautiful and sweet. I loved the delicate art style and the pastel colors. Each panel is blossoming with exquisite little details in the background of each scene, and strong emotions in the body language and facial expressions of the characters. It just carries you away to another world!

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Graphic Novel Review: Bronte

Brontë by Manuela Santoni

Brontë
by Manuela Santoni
1 out of 5 stars

This graphic novel begins when the Bronte sisters have returned from Belgium after completing their additional education. Charlotte convinces her sisters to try publishing a volume of their poetry together. Their brother, Branwell, is an alcoholic and opium addict, and their father, Patrick, is becoming more and more ill and weak. The sisters try to make some money with their writing to help support the family.

The story takes extreme liberties with the historical facts, to the point where very little of their real lives is actually reflected in the book. I also hated the way that the sisters’ personalities were represented. They are written as being foul-mouthed, belligerent, and anti-social; and that is presented to the reader as their “passion” when really they are just rude and mean in this book.

Nothing about their charitable work with their father’s parishioners is mentioned, nothing about their many visits with their close friends, and nothing about their strong Christian faith. Instead they are presented as being completely self-serving and isolated.

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Graphic Novel Review: The Secret Garden

The Secret Garden by Mariah Marsden

The Secret Garden: A Graphic Novel
by Mariah Marsden (Adapted by), Hanna Luechtefeld (Illustrations)
3 out of 5 stars

This retelling of the Secret Garden in graphic novel form is lovely, but has some issues with story-telling. I liked it, but it also has some flaws.

I liked the beautiful art style! The art is whimsical and sweet with bright colors. However, I didn’t like that there were so many tiny panels on each page. It felt too busy.

There is very little dialogue, which makes it difficult to follow the progression of the story. In the original novel, we get to see the gradual character development of Colin and Mary. But with so little dialogue to give the reader clues about what is happening on that internal journey for the characters, the characters seem to leap ahead with no indication of what made them change.

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February Reading Wrap Up

This video is NOT sponsored, but does contain affiliate links. Familius Affiliate Link: http://www.familius.com/happy-families-read-together/?utm_source=booksformks&utm_medium=Influencer If you make a purchase using an affiliate link, I may receive a small affiliate commission before taxes and at no additional cost to you. There are also Amazon affiliate links below. I only recommend books and products that I actually enjoy myself, and all the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts. Thank you for your support!

Emily Climbs by L.M. Montgomery https://amzn.to/3bjYZyP

Three Act Tragedy by Agatha Christie https://amzn.to/38blio8

Icefall by Matthew J. Kirby https://amzn.to/30d8AB0

Lycanthropy and Other Chronic Illnesses https://amzn.to/3sMwm30

Friendshipping: The Art of Finding Friendship https://amzn.to/2MSEBLK

Zeus the Mighty: The Maze of the Menacing Minotaur https://amzn.to/3ebSqQA

Flash Facts by Mayim Bialik https://amzn.to/38cTVKB

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost https://amzn.to/3ebxHwa

The Night Walk https://amzn.to/3v0pocP

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Classic Manga Review: Frankenstein

Manga Classics by M.  Chandler

Manga Classics: Frankenstein
by M. Chandler (Story Adaptation), Linus Liu (Art by), Daria Rhodes (Lettering), Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (From the original novel by)
4 out of 5 stars

Dr. Frankenstein becomes obsessed with the idea of infusing life into a created being, but when he succeeds, he is horrified at what he has done and runs from his creation, leaving it to fend for itself. Frankenstein’s monster roams the country, searching for his creator and finding only hatred and fear in everyone he meets. He vows to get revenge on the man who made him, and goes on a killing spree.

I thought the artwork did a wonderful job of showing the gothic melodrama and darkness of the story. There are many scenes that use shadows to show the tension in the characters. The art makes their intense emotions explode onto the page.

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Comic Review: Flash Facts

Flash Facts by Mayim Bialik

Flash Facts
by Mayim Bialik (Goodreads Author)
3 out of 5 stars

The Flash and other superheroes answer questions about scientific subjects while fighting off supervillains and doing good. They explore atoms, energy, virtual reality technology, DNA, the solar system, and even the depths of the ocean.

One thing that I really hate in scientific books is when a scientific THEORY is presented as if it were a fact. This is so unethical, and it would be so easy to correct. If only the text said, “One theory about this subject is … etc.” But they don’t say that. They write as if the details of climate change, renewable energy sources (like solar panels and wind turbines), and the age of the universe are established empirical facts that have been tested and proven. But they’re not.

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Book Review: Alexandra and the Awful, Awkward, No Fun, Truly Bad Dates

Alexandra and the Awful, Awkward, No Fun, Truly Bad Dates by Rebekah Manley

Alexandra and the Awful, Awkward, No Fun, Truly Bad Dates: A Picture Book Parody for Adults by Rebekah Manley ( Author), Catarina Oliveira (Illustrations)
5 out of 5 stars

Alexandra decides to try a 30 Dates in 30 Days challenge, and she swipes right for some dates that turn out to be decidedly awful, awkward, and no fun. These truly bad dates are immature, selfish, and downright gross. They leave her with the check, mansplain and lecture her, stay on their phones the whole time, or just don’t show up at all. At the end of her 30 dates, Alexandra decides to invest in herself and live her best life alone… with a few good friends.

I loved this funny picture book for adults! The writing is hilarious with clever hashtags scattered throughout. For anyone who has horror stories of terrible dates, this book will ring true and help you to laugh off those bad times with the same carefree and courageous attitude Alexandra shows.

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Comic Review: We Found a Monster

We Found a Monster by Kirk Scroggs

We Found a Monster
by Kirk Scroggs
4 out of 5 stars

Casey writes in his art journal to tell us the story of how monsters keep finding him! There’s a vampire in the attic, and gremlins in the basement. Frankenstein keeps recharging his brain batteries and making the electric bill go up. A huge cephalopod lives in the kiddie pool in the backyard. When a new girl arrives at school, Casey finds out that she is interested in monsters too. And there is a new pink monster in town.

I love the colorful art style! It really draws the reader into the story. The colors are so bright and fun. I love the funny expressions on the characters’ faces. Some of the sketches are just pencil drawings, and some are filled-in with color. It really looks like someone’s journal with text and illustrations thrown all over the page.

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