Poetry Review: Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell

Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell by Charlotte Brontë

Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
by Charlotte BrontëEmily BrontëAnne Brontë
4 out of 5 stars

I got 64% of the way into the book and decided to DNF it for now. About 90% of the poems are about death. They are very gloomy, all about suffering and despair and darkness. It was making me depressed, so I decided to DNF it.

The poetry is good. Some are almost genius. There were several poems that really touched my heart. The Brontës certainly have a way with words. So many of the phrases are beautifully crafted.

These poems are very emotional and wild and raging like a storm. But they can also embrace a little detail, a look, or word, or the simple comfort of a hearth.

Some of my favorite poems in this book were “Memory” by Anne Bronte, and “Stars” and “To Imagination” by Emily Bronte, and “Mementos” and “The Missionary” by Charlotte Bronte.

I also really liked a few lines in the poem “Gilbert” because they talk about the piano, and I’m a pianist.
“Some soft piano-notes alone
Were sweet as faintly given,
Where ladies, doubtless, cheered the hearth
With song that winter-even.”

Favorite lines from “Mementos”:
“The book-shelves were her darling treasure,
She rarely seemed the time to measure
While she could read alone.”

“The Missionary” was especially inspiring because I grew up overseas as a missionary kid. It talks about forsaking everything for the sake of your faith and helping others, and being glad to suffer if it means that you can steadfastly do your duty. I found it very moving, like a trumpet call to faith!

Favorite lines from “Stars”:
“Ah! why, because the dazzling sun
Restored our Earth to joy,
Have you departed, every one,
And left a desert sky?
All through the night, your glorious eyes
Were gazing down in mine,
And, with a full heart’s thankful sighs,
I blessed that watch divine.
I was at peace, and drank your beams
As they were life to me;
And revelled in my changeful dreams,
Like petrel on the sea.”

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