Book Review: The Last Battle

The Last Battle (Chronicles of Narnia, #7)
by C.S. Lewis

5 out of 5 stars

King Tirian hears rumors that Aslan has returned to Narnia, but he is not sure whether to believe it. When he investigates, he discovers that a false Aslan has been masquerading and fooling the Narnian people. He calls on the children of the ancient past to help him and to save Narnia from imposters and traitors. Eustace and Jill arrive just in time to rescue Tirian, but feel hopeless in the fight against the lies that have been built up around the false Aslan. How can you get people to believe the truth when they have swallowed so many lies?

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Book Review: The Magician’s Nephew

The Magician’s Nephew (Chronicles of Narnia, #6)
by  C.S. Lewis

5 out of 5 stars

In this prequel book, we learn about the origins of the world of Narnia and how Aslan first created Talking Animals. It’s fascinating to see how the magic of Narnia first came to be, and I love those moments when we recognize something we are familiar with from the other stories. We get a little “aha!” moment of delightful recognition as certain elements of the magic are explained and explored in more depth.

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Book Review: The Horse and His Boy

The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis

The Horse and His Boy (Chronicles of Narnia, #5)
by  C.S. Lewis

5 out of 5 stars

Shasta has lived all his life with a poor Calormen fisherman who adopted him when he was a baby. His adopted father is cruel, and so when Shasta meets a Talking Horse named Bree, they make plans to run away together to Narnia. Along the way they meet some other runaways, Aravis and Hwin, and together they must sneak through the bustling city of Tashbaan and cross the desert to reach Narnia.

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Book Review: The Silver Chair

The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis

The Silver Chair (Chronicles of Narnia, #4)
by C.S. Lewis

5 out of 5 stars

Eustace has returned to the world of Narnia with his classmate, Jill Pole. The two friends are charged with a quest to find the missing Prince Rilian, who disappeared ten years ago. Joining them in their journey to the North is a Marshwiggle named Puddleglum, who guides them through the lands of giants.

This book just gets better and better every time I re-read it! Rereading it this time around, I was struck with how many times forgetting and remembering are mentioned. The whole theme of the book is about remembering Aslan’s instructions regarding the quest. Unfortunately they often forget the instructions and the signs that they are supposed to look for along the way. This theme has another spiritual layer as well, since we as Christians have been given spiritual instructions about how to live a holy life, but we often forget and make mistakes.

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Book Review: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3)
by C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes (Illustrator)

5 out of 5 stars

Lucy and Edmund are back in Narnia, this time accompanied by their annoying cousin, Eustace. The siblings join King Caspian again, this time on a quest to the Eastern edge of the world. They sail through rough seas, encounter sea monsters, chart magical islands, and fight battles. But the greatest adventure of all is what they find at the edge of the world.

This one is my favorite of all the Narnia books! It appeals to something deep inside me on many levels. The magical adventures, the spiritual themes, poor sad Eustace and his character development, the beautiful imagery, and the imaginative settings all resonate with me in special ways. There are so many sweet little moments that tug at your heart!

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Book Review: Prince Caspian

Prince Caspian (The Chronicles of Narnia, #2)
by C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes (Illustrator)

5 out of 5 stars

Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy are back in Narnia a year after their previous adventures. They find that Narnia has changed a great deal, and now the evil Telmarines are in power. The siblings go to war to help Prince Caspian reclaim his throne and restore the Old Narnian dwarves, fauns, and tree-people.

I love the themes of obedience and faith in this second book of the series. The siblings try to rely on their own wisdom and ignore Aslan’s instructions and they get into huge trouble. It is only when they follow Aslan and obey with faith that things start to go right again.

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Book Review: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #1)
by C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes (Illustrations)

5 out of 5 stars

Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy finds themselves stumbling through a magical wardrobe into the land of Narnia, where animals can talk and the White Witch uses her magic to make it always winter and never Christmas. The siblings must travel to find the Great Lion, Aslan, who is the only one with the power to defeat the White Witch.

This book is so near to my heart, not only because of the nostalgia since I read and reread it again and again as a child, but also for the deep spiritual themes of sacrifice and redemption that mirror Christ’s salvation of this poor sinner. I find myself relating closely with each of the siblings as they interact with Aslan and as their spiritual journeys with Him begin.

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Non Fiction Review: The Leadership of C. S. Lewis

The Leadership of C.S. Lewis by Crystal Hurd

The Leadership of C.S. Lewis: Ten Traits to Encourage Change and Growth
by Crystal Hurd

5 out of 5 stars

What are the character traits that make a good leader? This book explores ten important attributes that are essential for any leadership role, and demonstrates how C. S. Lewis displayed those traits through his life and his writing. Here we analyze the details of why Lewis’s influence still continues to inspire countless Christians through his fiction and apologetic books.

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Non Fiction Review: The Abolition of Man

The Abolition of Man by C.S. Lewis

The Abolition of Man
by C.S. Lewis
4 out of 5 stars

Lewis shows the implications of the philosophical ideas that emotions are crude and invalid, and only “reason” should dictate our actions. Reason without emotion is unreality, and even if it were true it would only lead to the abolition of mankind. Lewis attacks the issue from several angles, debunking popular arguments that the purest form of reason is our instincts, or that benevolent actions can be found through pursuing “science” as the best moral compass for mankind to follow.

Lewis proves that moral absolutes do exist and that they are universal through all generations and cultures throughout all of time. These moral absolutes appeal to both our reason and our emotions, and you cannot cut them out of a person’s life without destroying that person. There are basic truths that are self-evident and omnipresent in all mankind.

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